Pennsylvania lt. gov. says Texas counterpart owes him bounty money after state uncovers voter fraud cases

Pennsylvania’s lieutenant governor is claiming that Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (R) owes his state money after law enforcement officials in Pennsylvania uncovered isolated instances of voter fraud in recent weeks.

“Recap: Texas sued PA claiming mass voter fraud to SCOTUS,” Lt. Gov. John Fetterman (D) tweeted on Wednesday. “Sure, TX got demolished, but my dude LG Dan Patrick put out a handsome reward for voter fraud. We delivered. He owes us $3M, Pennsylvania. That’s *a lot* of Shmuffins + Sizlis, folks.”

A week after the Nov. 3 election, Patrick offered up to $1 million to anyone who could provide proof of voter fraud anywhere around the country.

“I support President Trump’s efforts to identify voter fraud in the presidential election and his commitment to making sure that every legal vote is counted and every illegal vote is disqualified,” Patrick said in a statement at the time. “President Trump’s pursuit of voter fraud is not only essential to determine the outcome of this election, it is essential to maintain our democracy and restore faith in future elections.”

 

State officials in Pennsylvania have in recent weeks uncovered at least three instances of voter fraud, two of which involved cases of citizens casting multiple ballots for President Trump.

In a statement to the Houston Chronicle, a spokesperson for Patrick responded to Fetterman’s tweets, saying: “It is not clear why Lt. Gov. Fetterman continues on this topic since Democrats don’t believe in voter fraud, unless it’s Russia.”

Trump and his allies have alleged that widespread voter fraud led to a “rigged” election against him. Judges have dismissed several lawsuits in key battleground states, including Pennsylvania, brought forth by the Trump campaign contesting the election’s result.

Pennsylvania was also on a list of battleground states Texas sued earlier this month for what it alleged was a failure to abide by the Constitution as it relates to holding free and fair elections. The Supreme Court rejected that case on Dec. 11.

“Also, if I’m forced to sue my colleague to claim my handsome reward, my case is exponentially stronger than that pile of hot garbage lawsuit TX tried with SCOTUS,” Fetterman said. 

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